Saturday, March 1, 2014

In The Morning I'll Be Gone

In The Morning I'll Be Gone is released in North America and on audiobook format this week. I didn't want to do another blog about me, me, me but there have been so many newspaper reviews for Duffy #3 I hope you don't mind me reposting them here (I don't have any other website). Suffice to say that In The Morning I'll Be Gone is becoming the best reviewed book of my short crime fiction career. Still America is a VERY tough nut to crack so I'd appreciate it if you could leave me a review somewhere (amazon, good reads, audible etc.) or pass a copy to your mate who just happens to be the editor of The New York Times. I'm going to keep this post up for a week or so in case a curious newbie googles my name and comes here so feel totally free - regular blog readers - not to check back for 7 or 8 days. Anyway here's those reviews, I reckon it's a book most people will enjoy, although if you are upset by sturdy Chaucerian language now considered to be profane or you don't enjoy black humour or any kind of nuance in your Irish fiction then I urge you strongly NOT to buy this book...If you're on Amazon, or Audible or Good Reads, B&N, etc. please leave me a review if you get the chance. Thank you. 

A locked room mystery within a manhunt killer [is] a clever and gripping set-up that helps makes Duffy's third outing easily his best so far. 
The Sunday Times

Each book is a solid standalone, but it’s even better to ride the entire trilogy roller coaster with Duffy as your intimate companion.
The Boston Globe

Not content with constructing a complex plot, McKinty further wraps his story around a deliciously old-fashioned locked room mystery, the solution to which holds the key to Duffy’s entire investigation. Driven by McKinty’s brand of lyrical, hard-boiled prose, leavened by a fatalistic strain of the blackest humour, In the Morning I’ll Be Gone is a hugely satisfying historical thriller. 
  The Irish Times

This is the third in the series and, for me, the best, for it contains a locked room mystery at the heart of a drama about a major terrorist escape from the Maze prison, Belfast in 1983. Written in spare, razor-sharp prose, and leading up to a denouement that creeps up on you and then explodes like a terrorist bomb, it places McKinty firmly in the front rank of modern crime writers.
   The Daily Mail

[A] superb trilogy reaches its finality...The hunt for [Duffy's quarry] begins and ends spectacularly. McKinty is particularly convincing in painting the political and social backdrops to his plots. He deserves to be treated as one of Britain’s top crime writers.
    The Times

An action movie view of the Troubles...a fast and thrilling ride from the reliably excellent McKinty.
The Mail on Sunday

It's a sad day for fans of Adrian McKinty's smart 1980s-set procedurals featuring mordantly charismatic Belfast cop Sean Duffy. Not because his latest, In the Morning I'll Be Gone is any sort of let-down, but because it concludes what has been a hugely enjoyable trilogy. In some ways, Duffy resembles Iain Banks's young male heroes – crass and impetuous, but also wickedly funny and capable of an intense, redeeming empathy.
The Guardian

An older, more sobered Duffy, still unconventional and willing to take chances, but more reflective, more Sherlock Holmes. His growing maturity result in fewer bedroom scenes but there is plenty of excitement and suspense elsewhere in this intelligent and gripping yarn.
      The Irish Independent

Sardonic Belfast cop Sean Duffy [in] another terrific Troubles-set thriller 4.5/5
      The Sun


171 comments:

Dana King said...

Congratulations, Adrian. It launches here in March, and I'm all over it.

Alan said...

Adrian,This augurs well and as I know its literary value ,I indeed hope this "unlocks" the sales room in the UK/Ireland,US and Australia not to mention in translation.Best Alan

speedskater42k said...

Happy Publication Day, and best of luck!

I'll get the audio version as soon as it's available.

adrian mckinty said...

Dana

Thanks mate, I appreciate it!

adrian mckinty said...

Alan

Well we'll see wont we? I hope so too.

adrian mckinty said...

Speedskater

Doyle emailed me yesterday that he's done so its just up to Blackstone and Audible now when they want to release it...

speedskater42k said...

I want to take the opportunity to express my appreciation for your responsiveness on your blog.

It's a continued source of amazement to me that I have contact with an author whose work I admire and enjoy.

Today's example (where you informed me the status of the audiobook publication) is yet another example of this.

Thanks so very much!

adrian mckinty said...

Speedskater

No problem and it was easy because I was just talking to Doyle last night about this. He said it was fun doing - slight spoiler alert - a Maggie Thatcher impersonation...

speedskater42k said...

Well, it's appreciated!

And, (you may recall I've told you this before) you should come to Tucson for the Tucson Festival of Books. It's a great event and I'd be first in line for your presentation!

http://tucsonfestivalofbooks.org/

Steve said...

Congrats!. Already preordered on Audible - should be just in time for my winter vacation.

seana graham said...

I hope the British version will be available to me on Book Depository at some point. They are saying it's unavailable still. I wonder if the fact that they are now owned by Amazon has any responsibility for that. I'm happy to buy it, but I'd just as soon not pay shipping.

In any case, best of luck on the sales.

adrian mckinty said...

Steve

thanks buddy.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Amazon own book dep too? And Good Reads? And Audible?

Jesus I better keep in with those guys pretty soon they'll own the world of books.

seana graham said...

Yup. They might just end up owning the world of everything.

Anne said...

Hi Adrian
That bloggers review of The Cold Cold Ground is brilliant
(I must brush up my technique) and there are also some wonderful reader comments on the Goodreads site.BTW,
it might be worth your becoming a 'Goodreads Author' (not sure what that involves, but hopefully, not selling your soul) as every time an author does so, I get an announcement on my Facebook page, so it must be good publicity.
Anne

Alan said...

Adrian,I saw a copy of your new book on Ebay with reasonable UK shipping so Seana et al. might pay to see if there are other "Still warm copies" In The Morning... Needless to say I pounced.Best Alan.

adrian mckinty said...

Anne

Its a great review isn't it? And I mean great as in deep rather than praiseworthy. Love that kind of thing.

adrian mckinty said...

Alan

I dont think Amazon own ebay yet...

adrian mckinty said...

my top 10 favourite locked room mysteries in today's Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/29/top-10-locked-room-mysteries-adrian-mckinty

swooperman said...

Looking forward to this. just been contacted by Anne Marie at Profile regarding sending me a copy as she's seen I've reviewed you before, presumably on Mean Streets. bit out the blue & if you had anything to do with that, thanks. Eagerly awaited

Cary Watson said...

Congrats, but I'm annoyed that I have to wait until March for publication here in North America. Why the different roll out dates? I'm further annoyed by your locked room mysteries article--now I have to add a linear foot to my TBR shelf. One of the best locked room puzzles I've read was in a Maigret mystery, the title of which escapes me, but it involved a man shot in a locked room which faced a courtyard in which there was a well. The window to the room was slightly open, but there was no way a killer could have left via the window without being seen. Oh, and there was no murder weapon in the room. Ring any bells?

adrian mckinty said...

Swooper

Anna-Marie is great. And in person very funny and nice too.

adrian mckinty said...

Cary

I think the idea is this: release in the UK first, get some reviews and then add those reviews to the sheet that you send the book out with so that you can possibly get US newspapers and reviewers to take an interest in the novel. Unfortunately it hasn't reall worked that well this series. For Cold Cold Ground I got the best reviews of my entire career in the UK, Ireland and Australia and zero reviews in any of the American press. Even my friends couldn't get me a review in the papers they worked for. Because? Well I dont really know. They needed the space for all the Nordic Noir books? Celebrity authors? People peddling a more traditional view of Ireland? I just don't know.

This may be related or not but I wasnt surprised to see that BJ Novak (an actor from The Office) had his collection of short stories reviewed on the front page of The New York Times yesterday.

seana graham said...

Thanks for the Guardian locked room mysteries link. A lot of stuff there that I haven't read.

I don't mind if it's a puzzle I accidentally figure out, but I don't like cheats at this game at all. RIP, Steig Larsson, but I'm looking at you.

I don't know if people will figure out the locked room puzzle in In the Morning I'll Be Gone--I didn't, though I hovered around it a bit--but it's a wholly honorable puzzle, unlike some.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

The reader can be misdirected but not deliberatley misled (or I as prefer to call it lied to). Larsson lied to the readers by

SPOILER ALERT

putting forth the crackpot notion that a dead girl who wasnt really dead wd choose to communicate with her beloved grandparent by sending him a flower every year on her birthday - instead of sending him a postcard or phoning or something. At the end of the book she was surprised that he had misinterpreted this flower gift for 30 years. I mean, Jesus.

I also think its important that the reader gets all the information that the detective has so he or she can figure it out with him or her. This is something that the BBC's Sherlock doesnt do for example (not that anyone cares).

seana graham said...

SPOILER ALERT

****Don't pass this line if you haven't read the book


For me the lie was calling it a locked island when it became clear that anyone could get on and off the island whenever the hell they wanted.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

No it wasnt a locked island.

In mine I made damn sure to explain that the doors were locked AND bolted from the inside and there were no secret tunnels or way in through the roof, windows, etc. etc. I dont like magicians tricks, certainly not one that arent available to the general reader. And dont get me started on supernatural solutions....

seana graham said...

I thought that sneaky [spoiler alert] trick chimney in your book was pretty good...I mean it was mentioned on page 51, but only as a kind of unusually large vent...

Alberto d'Abbruzze said...

You are quite a good writer, Mr. McKinty. I have read several of your books and am very impressed. I look forward to reading 'In the morning I'll be gone'
It is refreshing to see complex literate fiction masquerading as who-dun-it. You do the world a great service.

Alan said...

Adrian,Thanks for the Guardian article with all the research that went into it.Shimada and Carr sound fscinating and well worth reading.Best Alan

Craig said...

Adrian,

Not sure if it's an error, but the book is available in the US in Kindle format. I ordered it (and it synced to my Fire) from Amazon yesterday.

http://www.amazon.com/Morning-Ill-Gone-Duffy-Detective-ebook/dp/B00HR2KE2I/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-4&qid=1391215598

adrian mckinty said...

Craig

Pretty sure thats a glitch which makes the US publisher furious. Its an ill wind though...because it means I can get some early reviews up on US amazon before the glitch gets fixed. So not exactly a win win but not a huge disaster either.

seana graham said...

Cool. I just downloaded one so I can do an accurate review in the near future.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

This is what I mean...Yes the US publisher isnt going to be happy but I'm sure it'll be fixed in a day or two and in the meantime I'll get some reviews up there...

adrian mckinty said...

Added Declan Burke's review in The Irish Times and the review from The Sun (my first review in The Sun I believe). There's also a review in The Times today by Marcel Berlins but it is pay walled so I can't add that.

Youd think with a set of reviews like this I'd be a shoo in to get reviews (not good reviews just reviews) in the US press too...well youd think wrong.

seana graham said...

I wouldn't actually think that, because despite the fact that we all speak a common language, and despite the global aspect of the internet, the U.S market seems to be on a different plane than any other market, and that includes, inexplicably, Canada.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

A different plane or a different wavelength or something. I just dont get it. Maybe years ago I offended someone at a party in New York and he or she issued an "you'll never eat lunch in this town again" style directive.

seana graham said...

I don't think it's personal, I think it's the impersonal mechanics of the thing. Not that that's any better.

Anne said...

For those who can't get the Times, Marcel Berlins' article has this great commendation: Adrian McKinty deserves to be treated as one of Britain's top crime writers'.

Brendan O'Leary said...

Here you go, from The Times:
The last of the Sean Duffy trilogy, In the Morning I’ll be Gone, starts with our hero, wrongly accused of misconduct, forced to resign from the Royal Ulster Constabulary. It’s 1984, sectarian violence is still rife in the province, and IRA terrorists have escaped from the Maze prison. One of them is Dermot McCann, whom MI5 is especially anxious to recapture. They arrange for Duffy to be reinstated in the force, on the grounds that he was once a close friend of the fugitive and might be able to trace him. His efforts meet with unanimous hostility, but he’s sidetracked into looking into Dermot’s sister-in-law’s suspicious death in a locked room in a pub. The hunt for Dermot continues and ends spectacularly. McKinty is particularly convincing in painting the political and social backdrops to his plots. He deserves to be treated as one of Britain’s top crime writers.

Brendan O'Leary said...

The previous review in today's crime roundup, for a Malcolm MacKay novel, starts: "Two superb trilogies reach finality" which is a reference to MacKay's book "The Sudden Arrival of Violence" and the following review for In The Morning I'll Be Gone.

I'm still plodding through some unfinished books before downloading In the Morning ...

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan, Anne

Thanks for that. I hate that paywall that the Times do. There's got to be a better system surely...

Very nice of Mr Berlins to say that. I'll add it to the quote sheet above before I do a new blog post tomorrow or later today in your time zone...

Brendan O'Leary said...

Don't know what else they can do apart from "pay per issue" . They're still losing money, as are the Guardian and Independent. Daily Mail seems to be about the only UK paper really successfully making the transition, and you can see how they do it. Celebrity clickbait.

Which made me think .. and sure enough:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/event/article-2349973/Gone-Girl-Life-After-Life-The-best-books-holiday.html

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

The Guardian loses money but it brings in massive amounts of revenue so somethings definitely not right there.

The Times I think shot itself by a too harsh paywall. The New York Times still - barely - makes a profit and they have a more fluid paywall. That might have been the model to follow rather than the more specialist WSJ paywall.

Brendan O'Leary said...

The Guardian seems to be funded by AutoTrader as well as George Soros & co. The Independent was funded by some oligarch last I heard. All baffling to me. I've managed in business for many years with an understanding of economics that extends about as far as the Micawber Principle.

Stuart MacBride was in the paper here recently as he was selling his house which got me thinking about authors and their income.
It's none of my business, but out of small-town nosiness I'd say he lived modestly well for an internationally successful author with no kids who had a decent full-time job before going full-time as a writer. I'd guess his wife would have been very supportive.

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

Well I've no idea what his income is but they flew him business class to Australia when I met him so he must be shifting quite a few units for someone!

I'm amazed the Independent stays in business. The circulation is about 30,000...

trevor said...

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2012/11/05/3625997.htm

About a third of the way in Mark Colvin has some pertinent words on the future of newspapers

adrian mckinty said...

Cary,

I've been informed that its more about lag times than garnerning reviews. The US publishing world is just a much bigger industry that it takes longer to get the mighty ship moving and turned around than in the UK were you can literally copyedit a book 6 weeks prior to publication! Cant get away with that in the N American market!

adrian mckinty said...

Trev


REALLY interesting. Many thanks mate.

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Mike Edwards said...

Hi Adrian-is there a way to contact you? I'm at inmyroom@verizon.net

Joe Velisek said...

Congratulations.

Just finished reading it - wasn't bad - wrote an Amazon review.

adrian mckinty said...

Mike

Sure I'll drop you a line. You're into music huh?

adrian mckinty said...

Joe

Five stars.


Not too shabby.

Many thanks mate!

Joe Velisek said...

Adrian -

Not a problem and you're welcome.

Granted it was no Fifty Shades of Grey - but I'll stick by what I wrote.

On a semi-serious note - and for what it's worth - "In the Morning.." is my favorite of the trilogy - and I very much enjoyed the first two.

As my daughter says - Just saying

adrian mckinty said...

Joe

I think the third one had the best jokes.

I had this killer scene set at a singles event which I ended up cutting but which was really funny too, very humiliating for Duffy, if I ever end up doing a Duffy#4 I'll use it there

Joe Velisek said...

Adrian -

Humiliation and a "singles event" - no real life experience there, but I could see it being funny.

I got a kick out of the introduction of Tom and Kate - particularly Agent McShineyShoes.

And just a suggestion - you may not want to pair up "Duffy" and "#4" for a bit - restless natives and all that.

adrian mckinty said...

Joe

No if I do write a Duffy #4 I'll need more than a funny scene. I've also got a good opening couple of chapters but there's no book there yet.

So I might just 1)leave the series at a trilogy 2) pub the opening chapters on my blog or elsewhere for free or 3) hoard them until an idea comes along.

Its definitely NOT going to my next book though. Thats going to be a standalone mystery set in 1906 German New Guinea.

adrian mckinty said...

Joe

Damn. Should never have gone over to Amazon. Some fuckwit just left me a two star review saying that the opening chapter was boring and that I had no idea how to begin a mystery novel! Jesus mate this is my 10th mystery novel, trust me son, I know exactly what I'm fucking doing.

He began his review with the mention of "British tyranny" opressing his people (of course he's an Irish American) so I should have figured that an axe was starting to get ground...

But really he didnt find the opening chapter interesting? or funny? He didnt like any of the jokes...

And now my rating is way down. Jesus Christ. Blood pressure through the roof. Note to self: Never read comment threads sober. Never read reviews sober...

Joe Velisek said...

Adrian -

A. Hoard the chapters - we'll wait.

B. Per "Atlas with the self-imposed chip on his shoulder" over at Amazon - My (Irish)grandfather had a strategy for such folks - "Fuck 'em."

C. My grandfather was more often right than wrong.

seana graham said...

Adrian, you more than most should know that Irish American politics are going to come into play when it comes to a book set in early 1980s Ireland. So you do have to factor all that out. Your fans are going to get the stars back on track, but when I tried to post my review on the American site I was told that the book wasn't available to review here yet. That despite the fact there are already seven or so reviews up. Apparently those came through something called Amazon Vine, but maybe Joe V knows more than I do about that.

Anyway, when I can put one up there I will.

adrian mckinty said...

Joe

You're probably right. I shall hoard.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

No you're right too. I'll try and keep a cool head. I did look up the kid's other reviews and this is way out of his ballpark. So why review a book that isnt your cup of tea, i.e. crime fiction, and pretend to be an expert on it?

If I ever do another Duffy I am definitely going to do that "audaciously boring" thing now. A full page of meaningless static will definitely get rid of the casual reader early!

Joe Velisek said...

Seana & Adrian -

The "Vine Program" - Amazon sends me a list of soon to be released stuff from which I can select some number of products if I submit a review within some specified time. (This imposed "deadline" for the reviews is a recent addition to the program and is causing some consternation among the Amazonians.)

I have no idea how/why I was "chosen" - beyond the simple fact that I buy a shitload of books - which does make some sense.

In The Morning... was/is on the recent list.

I believe I've left this before jvelisek@att.net. Send me a note if you're really curious and I'll forward you what Vine info I have.

Alan said...

Adrian,I was greated with Seana's experience .At least I could review you book on Amazon U.K.The curiouspart of this staggered U.S./U.K. publication release dates is that to get a book quickly delivered from the UK one has to resort to Ebay.It seems your British/Irish collusion scenarios appear as usual to be all to true in that today it appears the Brits colluded with a former Irish government in sending letters which promised immunity to I.R.A. gunmen on the run to secure the peace agreement re: N.I. Best Alan

Alan said...

Adrian.It appears that The Irish government claims no knowledge of these immunity letters which were worked out with the Sinn Fein without the knowledge of the Bertie Ahern goverment in Eire.Oh what a tangled web we weave...Best Alan

seana graham said...

Thanks, Joe. I'll just wait until they let us commoners in.

Adrian, I don't know if this was said before, but it struck me that the obvious thing to do for the fans clamoring for more Killian (and Michael Forsythe) is to write a prequel.

adrian mckinty said...

Joe

Thanks for the info. So that, er, gentleman actually asked for my book, got it for free and then dissed it. What a dick.

adrian mckinty said...

Alan

I laugh when people say my Duffy novels "stretch credibility"

If I'd written that an accused IRA man takes a letter out of their pocket in court signed by the Prime Minister that gets them out of jail free everyone would have laughed at me. Yet thats what happened yesterday!

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

But who would publish it? Falling Glass failed and Simon and Schuster who published Dead want nothing to do with me...

seana graham said...

Well, Serpents Tail still has it in print, and why couldn't Seventh Street do both of them here? And I see that even on American Amazon, it's managed to keep in the five star range, so that's not exactly failure in most people's books.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Oh no the reviews both online and in print were great but I think it only sold a couple of hundred copies on both sides of the Atlantic which couldnt even justify a reprint never mind a sequel. Alas. Cos I loved Killian.

seana graham said...

We shall see. You never know when someone like Nancy Pearl might rescue it from oblivion. Killian is a wonderful character.

Brendan O'Leary said...

"Irish American politics are going to come into play when it comes to a book set in early 1980s Ireland."
I can't help thinking that that's what lies behind the NYT dame's bee in bonnet.

Then there was the character on Amazon claiming to be from Carrickfergus who found it incredible that a Catholic would be in the RUC in early 1980s. A friend from over there had her brother assassinated for that very reason back then and you only have to Google the rest of them - uncommon yes, but certainly not unknown.

Now I'm feeling guilty for not putting reviews up on Amazon. And I only put a 4-star up when I did, just because I'm not a 5-star kind of guy.

Falling Glass was on sale in the local airport - that was my introduction to McKinty and led to the rest. I'm shocked to find there were so few sold.

Obviously I don't understand the publishing game.

But my thoughts were that good books don't date and a sequel to a poor-selling book could create "back-demand" for previous in the series. It's a lot of time and effort on a gamble though.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Yup Killian was cool but just didnt connect with the public unfortunately.

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

That guy drove me mental. He said that you couldnt hear bombs going off in Belfast from Carrickfergus which in fact in 1981 when I lived at 113 Coronation Road (Sean Duffy's house) in Carrickfergus I used to hear bombs going off ALL THE TIME from my bedroom.

And yup he said there were NO Catholic policemen in the RUC when in fact there were at least 1000 Catholic RUC (although fewer detectives admittedly) - my brother's best friend was a Catholic RUC officer with some amazing stories (he ended getting handcuffed to Michael Stone at one point).

I know I shouldnt get worked up by the haters but I just cant help it especially when they're talking utter and complete bollocks.

seana graham said...

Adrian, we ARE the public.

Alan said...

Adrian,If good wishes and high regard could translate into sales all of us who regularly follow your works and amazing blog would be the first to cheer. Indeed we would be reading about that newly wealthy and acclaimed unique Celtic/OZ Noir writer in the NYT Book Review section.Life is a bit longer than tomorrow and Falling Glass was a corker.The March 1 Independent UK had one heck of an article on double agents in Britain during WW Two.After the release letters from the British government this article adds more James Bond to the mix.Best Alan

Liam Hassan said...

Great reviews Adrian - am looking forward to reading it. As for the fuckwit reviewers on Amazon - I don t think it's just your books, there always seem to be the sound of axes grinding with a few of the poor reviews for other books. But that guy who claimed to be from Carrickfergus... What an arse.

By the way, are you really surprised by the whole government letters/ pardons story?

adrian mckinty said...

Liam

I think its an amazing story. Obviously it makes sense in terms of Real Politik and must have been part of a secret deal done by the Blair government to get the Good Friday Agreement done.

A get out of jail free card that you dramatically reveal on the first day of your trial?...Like I say if I'd written something as crazy as this in a book my editor would have would have put big red question marks all over the ms.

Lester Carthan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lester Carthan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lester Carthan said...

I preordered the book. This year I will answer Adrian's call and write a review on Audible but given the fact I'm a horrible writer and use my real name I'm finding the task to be daunting.

I don’t want to spoil the first two novels too much because hopefully there are lots of readers out there that just heard about the series or are long time Mickinty fans waiting for the series to wrap before collecting all three stories. So without providing detail what I love about the series is that this is the first time I’ve hated the main character on a personal level while simultaneously finding him incredibly compelling. Again without spoiling anything I was very happy with Duffy’s personal arc in the second novel and hope to find him much more likable in the aftermath that going to take place in the third novel.

Also if any new readers are out there while I haven’t read the third novel the first two novels are self-contained stories. You can easily read the second book without missing a beat and I’m going to assume that’s true for the third novel as well so don't let the fact it's a series of three intimidate you from jumping right in.

Lester

Lester Carthan said...

Since we are talking about Falling Glass the reason why it failed might have something to do with the fact the book wasn't available in print. This was okay with me because every year the best time I have with a story is when Adrian and Doyle get together to tell a story but still there was only one option to get the story and it was a little advertised one at that.

Also, this is funny now looking back at it, but at the end of the audio novel I thought something must have happened during the recording to eliminate the ending of the story. I was actually going to import the novel so I could get the ending but then Adrian discussed it here and I realized that I listened to the ending as written.

adrian mckinty said...

Lester

Its not really my fault that Falling Glass never appeared in a US print edition. It was offered to every single publishing house in the US and every single one of them said no thank you, including my two previous American publishers.

Maybe if I'd come with a more mainstream ending it would have been a different story. Still, I love that ending and wouldnt change it for the world...

seana graham said...

Lester, I wouldn't worry about your ability to write a good review.

Adrian, whatever you do, don't change the ending.

Lester Carthan said...

I have no idea if this was intentional on Adrian’s part but what so brilliant and frustrating about the ending of Falling Glass is that the book is never far from my thoughts because I will never be finished with the book. As a serious reader the only thing I can compare it to for someone not passionate about books would be watching the championship game of your favorite sport team of all time, the team you hate is up by three points but not to fear because at very last second your favorite player takes a shot at the goal worth five points and at that moment your house loses power and you don’t know what happens next. I’ve listened to the novel three or four times now and every time I get to the end a large part of me is expecting the scene to extend for thirty more seconds, that’s all I want.

Lester

seana graham said...

Lester, I guess we shouldn't say too much about the actual ending here, but I read it as though the characters had transcended themselves and become emblems of an eternal cosmic struggle. Perhaps perfectly balanced. Who can say?

Lester Carthan said...

@Seana

I’m guessing that’s a rhetorical question but your answer would be not for me that’s for damn sure. I know based on reader reviews that Adrian's work appeals to sophisticated intelligent cosmopolitan people who ponder the meaning of the universe in higher mathematics while waxing eloquent on the poem they loved so much that they committed to memory. Good for them. I come for the twisty plot, larger than life characters that are scary while being endless charismatic and most important someone you can meet on the street even if you wouldn't want oo, cool dialogue, violence and the humor. I can’t stress the humor enough, I don’t care how well written a novel is if there isn’t humor I’m out. With Adrian's body of work I get all this and more it's really crime fiction at it's best which is the purest form of entertainment that I can enjoy without feeling guilty later.

Lester

seana graham said...

Lester, I'm not disagreeing with you in any way, except to say that the ending was very very clever. It doesn't have anything to do with higher mathematics. It's just about whether you need resolution or not. This comes up in Stuart Little too, so it's not about being an advanced reader or anything. Adrian's writing has many terrific qualities, so throw me a bone and let me like the ending as is.

adrian mckinty said...

Les

I wouldnt go that far. Its just crime fiction. GOOD crime fiction I hope but just crime fiction for better or for worse.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

I love the downbeat, low key, anti climactic ending probably Jim Thompson's influence..

adrian mckinty said...

I can't induce a single one of you to leave me a review on Amazon.com, eh?


...this is why I'm quitting this miserable business.


and killing the blog.

seana graham said...

What? I just put up my review today, but they said that it's under review. Don't be so impatient.

Adrian said...

Seana

My point exactly. My lack of patience and thin skin and pig headed unwillingness to learn from previous experience are proof that I'm in the wrong profession.

Cheryl Carter-Smith said...

I was going to try to read it slowly and savor every word, but I had trouble putting it down. Thank you for ending the series the way you did. It was absolutely fitting. Fantastic series and definately one of my favorites.

Cheryl Carter-Smith said...

Just to add that I did leave a review on Amazon this morning as well as Goodreads and some other site along those lines.

speedskater42k said...

I downloaded the audio version this morning and will finish it in a few days. I'll be posting my review after that.

Alan said...

Adrian,I left my review on Amazon Uk and would gladly repeat it on a amazon US.Your wit,wisdom,literary knowledge as a "Rennaisance man " is sorely needed in a gasping ,covetous egocentric world.Best Alan

Anne said...

DONT GIVE UP, ADRIAN!!

Sorry for delay, but I am now halfway through your book ...totally gripping .... love the humour ... will post review on both Amazon sites and Goodreads this weekend.....

Cheers, Anne

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adrian mckinty said...

Cheryl

If it is the end...

No it probably is.


I think.

adrian mckinty said...

Cheryl

And MANY thank for the review!

adrian mckinty said...

Speedskater

Hey Doyles pretty good on this run isnt he?

adrian mckinty said...

Alan

I VERY much appreciate it. Thank you.

adrian mckinty said...

Anne

Its been 10 years now since I went down this path which is a long time to try anything.

I've got a book coming out in July but after that I think I really need to take a long think about my options and what I'm going to do with the rest of my life.

Peter Rozovsky said...

May I suggest that this would be a fine time to catch up on The Cold Cold Ground and I Hear the Sirens in the Street, if one has not read them?
=================================
Detectives Beyond Borders
"Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home"
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com

seana graham said...

I'm sorry, but your description of yourself is like that of any other writer I've had any acquaintance with. And I've met a few over the years.

Brendan O'Leary said...

No doubt you are driving a truck in Paraburdoo now and will never read this but I've relented and posted a 5-star review. I hope it's not counter-productive. I was prompted, of all things, by seeing Jonathan Creek on TV tonight.

adrian mckinty said...

Peter

Thanks for that too!

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

I wonder if there are ANY writers out there who are happy with the choices they've taken?

Whats her name? Pema Chodron maybe?

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

I appreciate it.

I fancy the natural gas rigs. 3 weeks on 1 week off for 6 months a year. 150K...

seana graham said...

Pema Chodron knows that happiness is an illusion. Which puts her ahead of the likes of you and me.

In writing up a Carson McCullers novel recently, I read one of the people who knew her say of her "she had no skin". Great writer, not the easiest person to be around, apparently.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

She's probably right about that. Dont let that stuff concern you.

It was probably simpler in the old days when you'd write a book and you wouldnt have to have a blog or twitter or read reviews or anything, it would just go out there and you could forget about it and get on with your life. Fire and forget as they used to say of the first heat seeking missiles.

But then again, the world has always been going to pot hasnt it? Cicero was complaining about "the kids today..." in the first century BC...

Anne said...

Have posted my review on Goodreads and Amazon.co.uk - on the paperback page (I'm the first here) and the kindle page too. I can't get posted on the Amazon.com site.
As far as I can see, you have only had that one really negative comment, so don't be too downhearted.

Brendan O'Leary said...

"I fancy the natural gas rigs. 3 weeks on 1 week off for 6 months a year. 150K"
It's generally equal time on/off Adrian. I'm surprised more books haven't been written by offshore workers. I know some have.

"Pema Chodron knows that happiness is an illusion"
Levi Stubbs knew that too Seana. Or H-D-H I guess.

seana graham said...

Actually, I don't know if Pema Chodron does actually think happiness is an illusion, come to think of it. I haven't read more than a bit of her stuff while standing around the cash register at the bookstore. I think I have the general idea though, just from living in Santa Cruz. Well, it's a non-Buddhist's idea of Buddhism, so it's probably wrong.

I don't know if authors got to just forget about it in the old days. I read a bio of Dickens last year, and by all accounts he was a hustler.

Cheryl Carter-Smith said...

Well, if you decide you're not quite done with Sean Duffy... I would be more than okay with that.

Peter Rozovsky said...

Hey now what's this, from fantasticfiction.co.uk (other than another Tom Waits title):

Sean Duffy
1. The Cold, Cold Ground (2012)
2. I Hear the Sirens in the Street (2013)
3. In the Morning I'll be Gone (2014)
4. Sixteen Shells from a Thirty Ought Six (2015)
=============================
"Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home"
Detectives Beyond Borders
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com

Brendan O'Leary said...

Peter, what about "Wasted and Wounded" ?

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

Even better. I think I'd fancy it and I'm no stranger to your actual hard work.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

She'd probably say that happiness and unhappiness were all equally fine, the important thing is to experience the experience...?

adrian mckinty said...

Anne

It must be my personality - its the one bad one I ALWAYS focus on.

adrian mckinty said...

Cheryl

We'll see.

adrian mckinty said...

Peter

I noticed that on Good Reads and Fantastic Fiction.

Thats what I gave the working title of the 4 chapters 1 wrote as a teaser for Serpents Tail, but I definitely wouldnt use that title as a possible Duffy 4. Way too long and I have a thing against books that begin with numbers.

If I do write a Duffy 4 and I do stick with the Tom Waits motif there is fortunately an embarrassment of riches.

But Good Reads and FF are wrong - there definitely will not be a book called 16 Shells From A Thirty Ought Six. At least not one written by me.

Lester Carthan said...

In a marathon session I listened to Cold Cold Ground again while playing GTA V on mute. I'm trying to figure out why I don't like Duffy despite loving him if that makes sense. I think it boils down to the fact that as another character pointed out Duffy isn't motivated by justice but rather revenge. I haven't gotten to the third novel yet, I'm listening to Sirens again, but I hope the fact that Shawn on an Island doesn't mean we won't see his co-workers each of whom is entertaining in his own right.

adrian mckinty said...

Lester

Sean wont be on the island in Sun is God. Thats a totally new character. And its set in 1906.

seana graham said...

Don't get me wrong, because I have nothing against Buddhists, but their goals are a bit high-minded for the likes of me. I don't think people are actually like that. Non-attachment is for when we wake up from the simulation and realize none of it was real. Although it probably won't be us, but whoever we are the avatars for. And believe me, those players have a lot to answer for.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Its a pretty unpleasant simulation. But then if they're running millions of simulations, simulating trillions of consciousnesses most of those are probably going to be horrible and the simulators are bound to be utterly indifferent to our well being.

Peter Rozovsky said...

Make's Duffy's story a five-book series, and call the next two Straight to the Top and Back in the Crowd. Like the suggestions? Pay me.

Oops. That's six.

seana graham said...

Right, but there's no reason WE have to feel detached about it.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

I think I've mentioned this before but I've always thought that there's a fundamental philosophical contradiction in Chodron et al's viewpoint. If the central idea is accepting the now in all its ugly manifestations then why meditate? You meditate to improve your ability to live in the now, right? But that then implies that you're doing something now for a future benefit which is the opposite of everything she believes.

adrian mckinty said...

Peter

I probably wont write any more of them at all. The indifference of the reading public is what will do for Inspector Duffy not an IRA bomb.

Liam Hassan said...

Ach Adrian - don t be giving up on it now. I m in early stages of writing a book - like probably a lot of people on this blog. I ve taken a lot of advice from your comments here - especially about creating your own mythology. If it ever gets published, it ll be set back home. Hard boiled does nt need to be in London or New York.

Plus, I ve been waiting for your review of the new Springsteen album. I was nt a reader of the blog when you put your last post rating all his albums up. No doubt, I d have a few issues to pick you up on!

I ve also put a few new reviews on Amazon - still have nt got around to the new book yet, but I will.

I also read a couple of articles in the guardian last week on the publishing world. One was Anne Rice commenting upon fake reviews on Amazon, something you ve raspised before. Also, one on the complete collapse of revenue for authors given the perfect storm of the recession, closing book shops and Amazon. Seems no one is making money on it.

Plus who in the fuck is Pema Chodron? (Liked the Levi Stubbs link, but was nt that line in What Becomes of the Broken Hearted by Jimmy Ruffin?

adrian mckinty said...

Liam

Anne Rice is right. If she cant make any money out of publishing then the rest of us are well and truly fucked.

I'm reading the biography of William Burroughs at the moment and they're at the bit in the book where his first book Junkie is published. Its considered a failure because the print run is only - get this - 150,000 copies.

Pema Chodron:

http://www.amazon.com/Pema-Chodron/e/B000AP9Y2A/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1394321180&sr=8-2-ent

Liam Hassan said...

Pema Chodron - hmmmm...

Take your point about William Burroughs. But he was a hard drug user who shot his wife in the head, so I m guessing book sales were nt pressing concerns to him a lot of the time.

Anne Rice's article was about the Amazon reviews - the other article was about a Booker nominee (sorry can t remember who it was) who has been writing all his life and says he has nothing to show for it. Have seen similar articles in various places over past while - seems writing is now a supplementary occupation, as opposed to an end in itself.

But then, should nt sales be a secondary point? You get great reviews - surely better than knocking out a Fifty Shades or Da Vinci Code?

adrian mckinty said...

Liam

Burroughs was filthy rich with a trust fund and no kids or wife to support (yup he conveniently shot her) so money wasn't that big of a problem...

I think the only reason to write is to appease your own graphomania.

Liam Hassan said...

Burroughs is about the only beat writer I d want to read. Maybe I m getting older, but I no longer see them all as trailblazers rebelling against the man, but a bunch of selfish fuck-ups who burned a lot of people round them. Think the best riposte to all that hipsterish rubbish is run, rabbitt, run by Updike.

Good use of the word geamhomania - but really why else would you write? Otherwise, you wind up knocking jack reacher novels out once a year.

Peter Rozovsky said...

Right. His grandpop founded Burroughs Corp.

adrian mckinty said...

Liam

Yeah Rabbit Run was written as a direct riposte to On The Road.

Burroughs is a hard man to like: he shoots his wife, serially molests little boys, tortures kittens, deals heroin and I'm only on page 278.

adrian mckinty said...

Liam

Fortunately in his later years it says that "Bono was a frequent visitor" which almost makes you believe in karma...

adrian mckinty said...

Peter

And his father sold his shares before the stock market crash...

Liam Hassan said...

Talking of bono, I watched a great doc last night on musicale shoals, and he was all over it. Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, Percy Sledge.... And Bono talking shit all over it. Still, it is worth checking out.

Another thing that annoyed me about the beats was thy all wanted to be black (Norman Mailer talked a lot of shit in this direction as well). Because black people, you know, lived REAL lives outside the system. And broke the law. And took drugs.

Vaguely racist, no?

seana graham said...

Liam, I see Adrian has given you a link on Pema, but from my perspective she is the patron saint of a certain segment of Santa Cruz life, or one of them anyway, which is why I know both so much and so little about her. I really have nothing against her, what's not to like?, but an example of her cult in my city is that when I worked in the bookstore, a little shambala edition of one of her many books came out, and though it was tiny, it was still ten bucks, but if you kept it right there by the cash register, you could sell maybe four or five of them an hour when the store was hopping. It isn't that she herself is inauthentic, it's just something about what it says about our community that I find a bit ironic.

Adrian, in her and the other Buddhists defense, I suppose the idea of meditation is just experience your experience more fully. With more awareness. Unfortunately for me, I don't always want to do that.

Oh, and Kerouac would be another saint here. I think I was probably too old when I read him. And then, I didn't think he and Cassady were awfully good to women.

Peter Rozovsky said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Peter Rozovsky said...

I don't suppose the Santa Cruzeros mention that Kerouac was a rabid Nixon supporter when he died any more than they mention that William S. Burroughs was heir to a multimillion-dollar industrial fortune.

seana graham said...

I'm not sure most of them get past On the Road, Peter. It is mainly fuel for them to buy vans and take off across the country in one. Which isn't a bad thing, I guess. It's a young guy's and sometimes a young girl's thing mainly. Most of the one's I've known well have turned out fine, but I also suspect that a lot of the homeless youth who have ended up here have been directly or indirectly inspired by it.

Peter Rozovsky said...

Oh, I was Kerouacy when I was a kid. to the point where, when the staff at my first, small newspaper in Massachusetts handicapped the week's pro football games, each of us under an alias, mine was Sal Paradise.

I read most of the Kerouac I could get my hands on when I was in my late teens.

A few years ago I happened to flip through a memoir by one of the big neocons, maybe Norman Podhoretz, at a chapter where he relates his acquaintance with some of the Beat writers. He wrote that Kerouac was a gentleman but a crappy writer and than Ginsberg was talented but a jerk.

seana graham said...

I still think I'll read Big Sur at some point. Kerouac seemed okay, just too much in Cassady's thrall. Of course, the end of his life is a sort of cautionary tale, but it's not the kind that dissuades people much.

I believe I've said here before that my sister had the honor of Ginsberg being a jerk to her for no discernible reason.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

You're absolutely right. Neither nice to women. Cassady was a dedicated and single minded wife beater.

adrian mckinty said...

Peter

Kerouac became a rabid right wing Catholic nut at the end. He told his editor in 67 that he wanted to go back to Europe to visit the death camps so he could dance on the graves of the Jews.

Peter Rozovsky said...

Here's what a Kerouac website has Kurt Vonnegut saying:

"Kurt Vonnegut - Thunderstorms in the head

"I knew Kerouac only at the end of his life, which is to say there was no way for me to know him at all, since he had become a pinwheel. He had settled briefly on Cape Cod, and a mutual friend, the writer Robert Boles, brought him over to my house one night. I doubt that Kerouac knew anything about me or my work, or even where he was. He was crazy. He called Boles, who is black, "a blue-gummed nigger." He said that Jews were the real Nazis, and that Allen Ginsberg had been told by the Communists to befriend Kerouac, in order that they might gain control of American young people, whose leader he was.

"This was pathetic. There were clearly thunderstorms in the head of this once charming and just and intelligent man. He wished to play poker, so I dealt some cards. There were four hands, I think—one for Boles, one for Kerouac, one for Jane [Kerouac’s wife], one for me. Kerouac picked up the remainder of the deck, and he threw it across the kitchen.

(Hyannis, Mass., mid-1960s)"

seana graham said...

I think probably we shouldn't take too much stock in what people do after they lose their minds, for whatever reason. It's when they have full possession of them that we can find them culpable. Not that it's always easy to discern just when that happens.

Anne said...

@ Seana
I recommend Off the Road by Cassidy's wife, Carolyn, if you want a true picture of the Beat Generation.
As for meditation, from my brief flirtation with Buddhism, I think the idea is to empty the mind of the bad stuff and concentrate on the pure and noble -a lot easier said than done, of course!

Anne said...

Liam is right about all authors struggling to sell their books, Anne Rice is not the only one - Fay Weldon and Penelope Fitzgerald have been quoted in recent weeks.
Another factor is the decline of the public library system, at least here in the UK. When I worked in bibliographical services for Derbyshire County Libraries, we would have ordered at least 40 copies of every one of your titles, Adrian, as crime/thriller is the most popular genre in lending libraries. However, I did manage to get In the Morning in paperback from my local branch library last week, so not all is lost yet!

seana graham said...

Thanks, Anne. I have also heard that the book Baby Driver by Kerouac's daughter Jan is good.

Susie Bright said...

You, you, you, buddy. It's utterly brilliant. Yes, I'm headed over to the Amazon review window-- and much more. This is where the glacier cracks.

seana graham said...

Go, Susie!

adrian mckinty said...

Susie

Wait! Arent cracking glaciers bad things?

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Susie lives in SC. Small world, eh? Or is SC just a big world?

marianne said...

I tried not to, but I raced through In the Morning like a greedy dog with a new Frisbee. Please tell us this isn't the last of Duffy. The trouble with the Troubles Trilogy is that you can't put the books down and they're over too soon. The humor of the characters is so quick and so true, it catches you off guard. It's rare to read a novel that makes you laugh out loud, especially a good mystery. Thank you for that.

adrian mckinty said...

Marianne

Thank you for that!

Its certainly the last of Duffy for now.

To be honest I much prefer to write standalones rather than series books but I do have a lot of fun with this character and I do have what I think is a pretty good idea for a possible Duffy #4. That ghost book "16 Shells" on Good Reads is definitely NOT Duffy #4 though. And the next book wont be a Duffy book either...

But he

Spoiler Alert


aint dead yet.

seana graham said...

Susie is actually rather famous, and though we don't personally know each other, we have friends in common. Anyway, she's a good one to have on board.

Lester Carthan said...

I just reviewed the first book on Audible. Over the past week listed to all three novels in order, the first two for a third and second time and the final novel for a virgin listen. .

My only complaint about the third novel and this is minor, was that due to the fact that quite a bit of time passes during the course of the book three the first section of the book seems rather compressed while the remaining two thirds have a very decompressed vibe expect for the ending which is compressed. I would have like Shawn to have revisited certain characters once the climax played out. I think this series would have worked better as series of our novels. I would mention what I loved about the book but that would take quite a bit more space and I need to organize my thoughts on that when I review it on Audible.

adrian mckinty said...

Lester

Chronology is always tricky. I'm of the school of thought that its better just to cut out the boring bits and move on, so sometimes perhaps the story can feel compressed I guess...

Anonymous said...

Fantastic story; so well-written. I am sorry to seen the Trilogy end - does it have to? Sean Duffy has many more stories to tell. In addition to being engrossing, these books have been an enormous source of information and understanding of the Troubles. I was in Northern Ireland last year; now I understand it so much better. I'm promoting your books here with my U.S. friends.

speedskater42k said...

I recommend you to lots of friends and a few have read your books. The latest one read "Dead I Well May Be" first and commented to me, "that was one of the best debut novels I have ever read. Looking forward to reading more of his stuff."

I agree with him!

adrian mckinty said...

Anon

I had an idea for a 4th book which I thought was pretty good, but now I'm so sure. I felt positive that this one wd get reviewed in the NYT and maybe finally be my breakthrough book but that isnt going to happen. So maybe its time to pack it in, or write under a pseudonym.

adrian mckinty said...

Speedskater

Thank you for that. Word of mouth is the only way I'll ever get anywhere in North America. I've never had a book launch, a book tour or any advertising. Publisher support has been minimal, so word of mouth is the only way I seem to get any traction.

Anonymous said...

It's hard to understand why your publisher is not promoting and supporting you here in the U.S. Time for a letter to the publisher from me....and I will do it. Fellow fans, let's write! Meanwhile, I plan to read the rest of Adrian's books. And I am still promoting for more of Sean Duffy.

adrian mckinty said...

Anon

Their approach has been somewhat curious I must say. They've told me that they have no money for promotion which I believe. But still Book 1 came out when I was living in Seattle and there was no book launch, no readings, no interviews in any American media - all very weird I thought at the time, coming off a host of amazing British and American reviews.

I've always thought that you have to spend money to make money. A little PR might pay huge dividends for all of us...